Anticipation


Our neighbors two doors down got a labrador mix puppy Annabell about six months before we got our black lab Daisy.  As Daisy grew, I could relate to seeing Annabell, bursting with energy, walking her owners.  Daisy was growing weary of her chain in the back, while waiting forever for the contractors to complete our backyard fence.  The confinement was so distasteful to Daisy that she started to dart out of the yard whenever she got the chance.

Whenever our kind neighbors  would see Daisy on the loose, they would gently invite her into their backyard with Annabell.  Obvious to everyone that Daisy and Annabell hit it off, they told my husband to feel free to put Daisy in their backyard anytime.  Since Annabell recently destroyed our neighbors’ couch, having Daisy roughhouse with Annabell in the yard, burning needed energy, was a valued perk.

The new fence raised our quality of life.  But Daisy got too big and strong with pulling her leash for the kids to safely walk her.  I became the only one to consistently give her a morning walk around the block.

And on the home stretch of our walk, we passed Annabell’s house to see her on her hind legs, front paws on the fence bobbing for Daisy.  Once we walked past her drive Annabell darted to the south gate and, as had become our routine, I would let Daisy in for a two to three hour puppy play date.

Opening the gate the two perros would mouth and jump and run and climb.  And the world could not be more perfect for Daisy and Annabell than at that moment.
We’re not so different from our canine friends.  Our contact with our friends doesn’t have to be super lengthy, but it does need to be consistent and predictable, so with anticipation we, too, can experience that precious connection with someone who knows us, loves us, listens to us, and even plays with us.

The Catholic Women’s Guide to Healthy Relationships Tip:  Make sure you know when you will get together next with your friend.